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Treatments | Treatments for common eye conditions.

Scleral Lenses

What are Scleral Lenses? First and foremost, Scleral Contact Lenses are one of the most remarkable pieces of technology in our modern eye care era. They are the first choice of our doctors at the Cornea Lens Institute for many reasons. They are certainly one of the most comfortable contact lenses in the world and [Read More]

Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses

What are Rigid Gas Permeable Contact Lenses? Rigid Gas Permeable contact lenses, or RGP's, are one of the oldest types of contact lenses available to correct the irregular cornea. They are made of a durable plastic that transmits oxygen, but should not be confused with hard contact lenses (PMMA), which are no longer in use [Read More]

Reverse Geometry Technology

What is Reverse Geometry Technology? Contact lenses are often manufactured with a traditional curvature that is much like a golf ball curve. However, the corneal diseased eye is misshapen and may have "dips and valleys" on the curvature of the cornea. A reverse curve allows our doctors to reshape the cornea to provide better vision [Read More]

Medically Necessary Lenses

What are Medically Necessary Contact Lenses? When a person has been diagnosed with a corneal disease or has suffered from an eye injury, distortion or irregular shaped corneas may be the result. We often refer to the compromised cornea as a "wrinkled cellophane effect". This results in poor vision that may not be corrected with [Read More]

Hybrid Contact Lenses

What are Hybrid Contact Lenses? Hybrid contacts are large-diameter lenses that have a rigid gas permeable central zone, surrounded by a peripheral zone made of soft or silicone hydrogel material. The purpose of this design is to provide the visual clarity of GP lenses, combined with wearing comfort that is comparable to soft lenses. Hybrid [Read More]

Corneal Cross Linking

What is Corneal Collagen Cross Linking (CXL) ? Corneal Collagen Cross Linking (CXL) is a technique that was first used in 1998 to treat patients with a disease call keratoconus. In keratoconus, the cornea can become weak, thin, and irregularly shaped. Instead of keeping its normal round shape [Read More]